Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Tsunozu Otoshi Shrine

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Tsunozu's Otoshi shrine is in the old part of the village where a maze of alleys and narrow roads and traditional houses are still maintained. Most villages have old sections like this.

It's matsuri day, so the streets are lined with shimenawa, fresh bamboo, and shrine banners. The shimenawa lining the streets are to protect from evil as the kami will be passing by later in the matsuri procession.

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At the shrine the flags are out in celebration of the matsuri, which occurs after the harvest in early November. As well as the main kami, Otoshi, there are secondary shrines to Inari (Otoshi's brother), Omoto, the local land kami, and konpira.

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The mikoshi stand ready to be carried through the village later. While I was visiting the shrine the ceremonies were underway to transfer the kami into the mikoshi.

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One of the 2 komainu (Korean Lions) flanking the steps up to the shrine. These are a fairly standard modern design.

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Mr Kono is the priest of the shrine. He is also responsible for 9 other shrines in the area, but even so his duties do not pay enough to make a living. Buddhist priests have the VERY lucrative funeral business to pay their wages, but other than at major shrines, most Shinto priests must work at a regular job.

3 comments:

  1. He is also responsible for 9 other shrines in the area, but even so his duties do not pay enough to make a living. Buddhist priests have the VERY lucrative funeral business to pay their wages, but other than at major shrines, most Shinto priests must work at a regular job.
    =====
    This is a splendid description regarding the difference between poor Shinto priest and rich Buddhism monks.
    It is said that after the bubble economy blast, Kyoto geisha houses, cabarets etc survived thanks to the continuous patronage by clientele of monks.
    Ken

    ReplyDelete
  2. do you mean monks or priests?

    I know there are devout buddhists in Japan, but in general it is hard to take Japanese Buddhism seriously....

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  3. Last spring, I had the once-in-a-lifetime chance to attend a geisha party. This was part of a film we were shooting, and the director's introduction to this floating world was of course made by a priest.

    An ephemeral time was had by all.

    ReplyDelete

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